What You Need to Know About the Septic System Drainfield

The topic of drainage and septic systems is not one that typically comes up at the dinner table.But, it’s a topic everyone who has a septic system should be aware of. The water and waste in your home depend solely on this system to get flushed out. And when the system is clogged, broken, or needs cleaning, it can become messy quickly. If you ever find yourself in one of these scenarios, keep Metro-Rooters in mind. Our team services Jacksonville and Orange Park with expertise.

What is a Septic System?

The septic system is your alternative to having your home or business on the public sewer system. Instead of being connected to the rest of the city, you have an onsite water treatment system. These systems are different and built differently from company to company. However, some of the materials commonly used are concrete, fiberglass, and polyethylene. The main idea
of the system is to get rid of the wastewater in a home or business.

Additionally, the system’s design is built to filter out the liquids and solids. It all starts in the home or business’s sewage line that connects to the septic tank. Once in the tank, the liquid waste rises to the top of the septic tank while the solids sink. Then, the waste is sent out through these outlet lines. The system then can distribute everything appropriately and ensure the liquid gets sent out to the fields. The septic system itself is very advanced and sorts everything expertly.

Drain field and Leach Field: Same Meaning, Different Terms

When discussing septic systems, the terminology can be a lot, especially if you are no expert. If there’s one thing Floridians are good at, it’s creating new terms for different things. One word, in particular, is drain field. You may know a drain field as a leach field; however, in Florida, we often hear and say drain field. Both mean the same thing and are critical components of any septic system.

How Does The Septic System Function?

However, if you are unfamiliar with what a drain field is and what it does, let us break it down for you. The wastewater in your home or business will flood into the septic tank. Once there, it goes ahead and gets flown into the drain field, otherwise called leach field. The drain field will then go ahead and have the wastewater distributed across all of the leach lines. The system does not do this randomly. There is a method to the madness, making these systems more sophisticated than most think.

The key to this system functioning effectively is the septic tank and the drain field being size related. Essentially, if the septic tank is large, you need to have a larger drain field. The reason is that you need the drain field to hold the water that is getting sent out. Another rule of thumb is to keep the drain field away from any source of drinking water or standing water. The
wastewater is being treated and disposed of with this system. The last thing you want to do is have it interfere in any way with other bodies of water.

All in all, you want your septic system, from the distribution box to the drain field, to be built the right way. The system can help when it comes to water and wastewater in many ways. But you do not want to see surrounding soil, water, and other pure areas tainted with the wastewater. With the Metro-Rooters team, you can have peace of mind that your septic system gets built correctly. We are also here to help when you have any issues or clogs related to the system.

Sewer Line Problems

As Americans we take many of our modern conveniences for granted. Our “invisible systems” throughout our homes make our lives easy, convenient and sanitary in many cases. This includes buried cables and our sewer lines. We flush a toilet or take a shower and the waste water goes down the sewer line to your municipalities sewer, or your properties septic system. These are a few conveniences we tend not to think about until a problem arises. In this blog we will address some of the more common causes of a sewer line problem, and some warning signs that will alert you to a potential issue.

Common Sewer Line Issues

There are several reasons you may be experiencing sewer line problems, below are some of the more common.

  • Corrosion of the pipe due to age
  • Fractures in the sewer line due to shifting soil
  • Plant or tree roots causing damage to the sewer line
  • Disposing of fats, oils, or any other drain clogging items down your sink or toilets.

Unfortunately, due to your sewer lines location (below ground) you cannot observe the damage that may have occurred, so it is important to be familiar with common warning signs and addressing them promptly.

Sewer Line – Warning Signs

Gurgling Noises

When flushing a toilet are you hearing a gurgling or percolating noise? When running an appliance, you may hear a strange noise coming from your toilet. Don’t just assume the noise is due to your home’s age, it could be a sign there is trouble brewing down below.

Spike in Your Water Bill

Have you noticed your water bill has increased significantly compared to your previous months bill, even though your water habits have not changed? It may be a sign that you have a significant leak in your home or yard. In this instance it is probably not your sewer line, rather a leak in your main water line.

Water Draining Slowly

All of us have dealt with a small clog. For example, your sink or shower/tub drain may be draining slowly, you address the issue and find out there is no evidence of a clog or buildup in the pipe. Yet the drain continues to be clogged. All drains in your home are connected to the main sewer line, so mysterious clogs could be a sign of a sewer line issue.

Several Clogs at Once

Are you noticing that your drainage problem is affecting your toilet, sink and tub? If you have a typical clog in your bathtub’s drain, that should not affect your toilet or sinks ability to drain properly.  However, if your bathtub is not draining and your toilet isn’t flushing at the same time, the water is probably being held back by a system wide issue versus a clog.

Toilet Backups

This is the last thing you want to happen, especially after using the restroom. If you find yourself in this situation, and it is not due to an overabundance of toilet paper or a septic system, this could be an indication of a faulty backwater valve that’s not doing the job of keeping the city’s sewer water out of your home.

Green Patches of Grass In Your Yard

Living in Florida we understand how hot it can get and how our grass has a tendency to burn or dry out during the summer months. If you have sections of your grass that are pristine in color, there is a good chance you have either a main water line leak or a sewer line leak. Either way it needs to be addressed immediately.

Smelly Yard

If you are experiencing a strong sewer like odor coming from your yard, this problem has problem been festering for some time. This is usually a sign of a major sewer line rupture. You will want to keep children and pets away from this area and contact a plumber ASAP.

Professional Sewer Repair Specialists

Your home is your largest investment. Never wait or ignore issues that you know do not add up. This can be extremely costly and can be a health hazard. If you are experiencing sewer line related issues, lack of water pressure, or any plumbing or septic related issues contact Metro-Rooter today. We specialize in residential and commercial plumbing emergencies. Contact us today at (904) 695-1911 and have one of our highly qualified plumbers assist you with your plumbing problem.